Ear disorders that cause deafness, noise, and dizziness




Ear diseases, which come to all people of all ages, sometimes make daily life difficult to the extent that they feel uncomfortable, and there are many studies showing that hearing loss due to ear diseases such as otitis media may increase the occurrence of dementia.


 Let's take a look at the symptoms of the most common ear diseases and find out their causes and treatments.

- What is hearing loss?


The causes of hearing loss are very diverse, and as we age, genetic factors, noise, and various drugs act in a complex way. Hearing loss can occur when the function of the cochlea gradually declines with age, and problems occur in all stages of the ear canal, middle ear, inner ear, and nerves. Hearing loss is thought to occur gradually due to genetic causes or noise and ingestion of various drugs. However, it is important to immediately identify the exact cause of hearing loss regardless of the location, especially when hearing loss that occurs slowly occurs only on one side or occurs from a certain moment.

- What is noise-induced hearing loss?


It is easy to think that noise-induced hearing loss occurs only when a person hears a very loud sound, such as a gunshot or explosion, but anyone can develop it after being exposed to noise of sufficient intensity for a certain period of time. Also, even with mild hearing loss, special attention is required because hearing loss has an important effect on communication ability.

Noise-induced hearing loss can be prevented, but unfortunately our environment is surrounded by more noise, putting many people at risk.

Reversible hearing loss, in which hearing is restored after a rest period after exposure to noise, is called temporary hearing loss, and permanent sensorineural hearing loss is sometimes called noise-induced hearing loss. Noise-induced hearing loss caused by workplace noise is sometimes called occupational hearing loss separately because noise in the living environment has increased recently and noise has become a problem in the workplace.

- What is age-related hearing loss?


Hearing loss is one of the most common symptoms of the elderly, and for most people, hearing loss is a gradual loss of hearing as they age. It is estimated that one in three people over the age of 60 and 40-50% of people over the age of 75 will suffer from hearing loss. Hearing loss makes it difficult to understand sounds that are essential to daily life, such as communicating with others and responding to warnings to emergencies. All of this can be dangerous, as well as frustrating or embarrassing.

Hearing loss associated with age-related hearing loss is usually greater in the high range. For example, it can be difficult to hear a bird chirping or a phone ringing nearby. However, low-pitched sounds, such as a passing sound, are clearly audible when a truck rumbles through the street.

- Common ear diseases, otitis media and tinnitus


The causes of hearing loss are very diverse, and as we age, genetic factors, noise, and various drugs act in a complex way. Hearing loss can occur when the function of the cochlea gradually declines with age, and problems occur in all stages of the ear canal, middle ear, inner ear, and nerves. Hearing loss is thought to occur gradually due to genetic causes or noise and ingestion of various drugs. However, it is important to immediately identify the exact cause of hearing loss regardless of the location, especially when hearing loss that occurs slowly occurs only on one side or occurs from a certain moment.

- chronic otitis media


Chronic otitis media is a common cause of hearing loss. In infants and children, the cause of hearing loss is usually otitis media due to upper respiratory tract infection. Yu , acute otitis media occurs in children should be careful, because hearing loss can quickly drop to proceed with chronic otitis media as if left untreated at an early stage. If the persistent inflammation of the middle ear progresses to chronic otitis media, the pus in the middle ear passes through the eardrum and comes out through the outer ear, making sound difficult to hear.

Diagnosis is based on the duration and symptoms of otitis media. It is helpful to observe the degree of perforation of the eardrum, the location and the degree of depression, and the presence or absence of cholesteatoma using an otoscope. Hearing tests can determine the degree of hearing loss, and in the presence of pus, bacterial testing is essential to select an appropriate antibiotic.

- otitis media with effusion


Otitis media with effusion is common in children with frequent upper respiratory tract infections. This disease is caused by exudate in the middle ear when the tube between the ear and nose, that is, the ear tube, fails to function due to an upper respiratory infection.

Children with otitis media with exudative otitis media turn on the TV too loudly, and without their parents or themselves knowing it, their academic life is disrupted.

For early detection, if the symptoms listed above appear in a child, the possibility of otitis media with effusion should be considered. At this time, it is possible to observe the mobility and turbidity of the eardrum using an otoscope, and objectively evaluate it through a hearing test and an impedance test. At this time, the most accurate diagnostic method is to check the exudate by puncturing the eardrum.

If otitis media with effusion continues, early detection and treatment is important because it can progress to atrophy of the tympanic membrane, destruction of the ossicles, chronic otitis media or cholesteatomatous otitis media, and eventually hearing loss.

- tinnitus


Tinnitus refers to a case in which only the patient himself hears the sound even though there is no sound stimulus nearby, and it is a very common symptom that about 10% of adults have tinnitus. The frequency increases with age, especially as hearing loss increases. Since most tinnitus occurs with progressive hearing loss, it is thought to be caused by abnormalities in the cochlea and auditory system. However, since it can rarely occur due to vascular abnormalities, it is necessary to confirm the cause of tinnitus in the case of a new occurrence or sudden exacerbation of tinnitus.

There are two types of tinnitus: 'objective tinnitus', which can be heard by people around you, and 'subjective tinnitus', which cannot be heard by people around you but only heard by the patient himself. Almost all patients complain of subjective tinnitus.

Objective tinnitus is mainly caused by abnormalities in blood vessels or muscles, and is mainly caused by contraction of small muscles in the ear or muscles of the palate. .

The most common case of subjective tinnitus can be caused by various causative diseases, and most cases are caused by abnormalities of the cochlea and the auditory nerve. There can be various causes such as hearing loss due to damage to the cochlea due to noise, otitis media, etc., age-related hearing loss, otosclerosis, earwax in the external ear canal, sudden hearing loss, etc. In addition, it can be caused by various drugs.

- Can dizziness be due to ears?


The inner ear consists of the vestibular organ and the cochlea (cochlea), and the vestibular organ is responsible for the sense of balance and rotation of the body, and the cochlea is responsible for hearing. Therefore, when there is an abnormality in the vestibular system, dizziness occurs, and when an abnormality in the cochlea occurs, hearing loss occurs.

- Benign paroxysmal positional shift dizziness (otolithiasis)


Benign sudden positional positional vertigo is the most common disease among vertigo, and the patient seeks immediate medical attention due to sudden symptoms. The most common case is rotational dizziness, such as spinning for 1-2 minutes when turning from bed, when getting up from lying down, or when lying down from a seated position. You may also experience similar dizziness when standing up from bending or turning your head or body rapidly. The dizziness is usually worse in the morning and usually lessens in the afternoon after being active. Usually, dizziness, which feels like spinning, ends within 1-2 minutes, but later, when there is a change in position, the dizziness may be felt repeatedly. When you feel dizzy, you may feel nauseous or even vomit.

The cause of this disease is that when a substance called otolith, which is normally present in the vestibular organ, falls from its original position and enters the semicircular canal, the vestibular organ is stimulated as the head is rotated, resulting in dizziness.

Benign sudden positional positional vertigo may recur frequently after treatment.

Although the causes are slightly different, most of the hearing loss is very difficult to restore to the original hearing once it occurs, so if you feel like one day you have a feeling of discomfort in your ears or that you cannot hear well, be sure to go to the nearest otolaryngologist to prevent the progression of the disease at an early stage. it is important