Bladder cancer, especially as you age



 Bladder cancer is a malignant tumor that occurs in the bladder. Most of the cancers in the bladder are epithelial cell tumors derived from epithelial cells.



It usually occurs in people in their 60s and 70s, and men are three to four times more likely to develop it than women. Smoking is the most dangerous cause, and occupational exposure to carcinogens is also associated with the outbreak. Cancer, which is limited to bladder during diagnosis, accounts for three-quarters of all bladder cancers.

  According to the medical status of bladder cancer by age in 2018, 12,868 patients in their 70s (34.6 percent), followed by those in their 60s (26.7 percent), those in their 80s and older (7694, 20.7 percent). It is estimated that the recent increase in the number of elderly people and the development of medical examinations reflects the increase in the diagnosis rate of bladder cancer among the elderly.

 By gender, men account for 81 percent of all patients, and women account for 19 percent, which is 4.2 times the difference.

The large difference in the number of male and female patients can be attributed to the difference between males and females in physiological reactions to cancer-causing substances. It is most important to detect and treat cancer earlier than the difference in frequency between men and women.


- Symptoms -

 The main symptom of bladder cancer is that blood (hematuritus) is to be mixed in urine without pain. The degree of hematuria is not necessarily consistent with the degree of bladder cancer, so any kind of hematuria should be suspected of bladder cancer.

 If bladder cancer causes necrosis, is accompanied by stones, or if it is accompanied by epithelial cancer, it may show bladder-stimulating symptoms such as gold urea (sudden urination), pain when urinating, and anemia.

If urea blockage (blockage of urine length) occurs due to bladder cancer, lateral abdominal pain and lower limb edema can occur, and if bladder cancer progresses, lumps can be felt in the pelvis.

In advanced cancers, hematuria is very severe, and urination is often accompanied. Although symptoms vary depending on the area, they usually complain of weight loss and pain.

    

- Risk factors -

 Although the exact cause of bladder cancer is not yet known, age, exposure of various chemicals by smoking, painkillers and anti-cancer drugs, infections and bladder stones, and radiation therapy are known as risk factors for bladder cancer.


-Age-

 Bladder cancer tends to increase in proportion to age. According to the medical status of bladder cancer by age in 2018, 12,868 patients in their 70s (34.6 percent), followed by those in their 60s (26.7 percent), those in their 80s and older (7694, 20.7 percent). It can be seen that more people are in their 60s and 70s than those in their 40s or younger.


-Preparation method -

 The most important and effective way to prevent bladder cancer is to avoid secondhand smoking along with smoking cessation.

It is also good to get plenty of fluids. It is also important to check my physical condition and get regular medical checkups. If you have hematuria symptoms, you must visit the urologist for regular checkups.

Eating habits and exercising are important for healthy old age in the 100-year-old era, along with regular medical checkups.